Dr Vacy Vlazna writes to British High Commission re UK arrest warrant law 12Jul10 July 12, 2010

Her Excellency Baroness Valerie AMOS
High Commissioner
British High Commission
Canberra ACT

Your Excellency

I am shocked that Britain would  consider changing the arrest warrant law to facilitate any alleged war criminal entering Britain unchallenged. Iti s further  repugnant that this consideration is due to pressure from the State of Israel which violates international law daily.

It is  morally ironic that Israel is  concerned  that last week a high-ranking officer Udi Bin Moha cancelled his travel to Britain to pursue his academic study lest he gets arrested on charges of war crimes, and yet an Israeli court has denied Fatima Sharif, a Palestinian lawyer from Gaza the right to  study a masters at a West Bank university. Let alone introduce in April 2010 apartheid Military Orders No1650 and 1649 which turns all West Bank Palestinian residents into inflitrators subject to immediate deportation constituting a breach of the 4th Geneva Convention and in particular Article 49 which prohibits any kind of forcible transfer as well as the deportation of civilians from the occupied territory.

I strongly urge your government to maintain the arrest warrant law.

Reference:

Israel denies right for Gaza woman to study in occupied West Bank

Middle East Monitor8 July 2010

Sharif, who earned her law degree in Gaza, told Reuters she has not left the territory via Israel for years. “I feel like I’m living in a cage. Somebody is holding the key,” she said.

The Israeli ban keeps curbs to movements of Gazans who want to leave the territory by crossing through Israel.

An Israeli court on Wednesday denied a right to a Palestinian woman from the Gaza Strip to study in the Israeli-occupied West Bank despite Israel’s recent policy to ease the siege on the occupied Gaza land.

Three justices found for the Israeli Defence Ministry’s view that Fatima Sharif, 29, a Gaza human rights attorney, “failed to meet the criteria” for an exit permit to entitle her to travel to the land-locked West Bank.

Sharif had planned to pursue a master’s degree in human rights and democracy at Bir Zeit University near the West Bank town of Ramallah, where Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas’s headquarters are located.

“We were not persuaded that in the current political and security situation, that personal circumstances would justify any intervention in the decision,” the justices wrote.

Human rights activists say Sharif is one of thousands of Palestinians unable to cross to the West Bank from Gaza due to longstanding Israeli bans.

The Israeli ban keeps curbs to movements of Gazans who want to leave the territory by crossing through Israel.

Palestinians can only go out of Gaza through the territory’s border crossing with Egypt if borders are opened.

Sharif, who earned her law degree in Gaza, told Reuters she has not left the territory via Israel for years. “I feel like I’m living in a cage. Somebody is holding the key,” she said.


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